A/S in 1964

63 dream'n

Well Known Member
Supporting Member 3
#41
I have some aluminum spacers to put under the fronts to get a bit more air. Dont want to swap,springs. The original springbtags are still on them. REAL reverse chrome wheels are tough to find and not cheap anymore. Going to scrap,the whitewalls for now and use the old Dragmasters up front . Gonna drop the rear a bit too. 10 + years with the car so a bit bored with it.
It’s a damn nice ride...... I’d rather be bored with it, than....... not have one at all......... just say’n!!!!!
 

64ss409

Well Known Member
Supporting Member 9
#43
Here are some different wheel combos from over a few years.
May3,64.JPG
Original P12 14x6 wheels with original tires. (wedding day, May 1964)

64billings3.jpg
Keystone Classic 14x6 reversed on front, Sears Roadhandler tires. Olds 14x7 wheels on rear with M/T slicks. about 2005

Christmas card photo.JPG
About 2015, 14x6 chrome spoke front 215x14 Toyo tires. 14x7 rear and M/T slicks. I forgot the brand of wheel, I wouldn't recommend them, a little crooked, hard to balance, unilug.
 

55Brodie

Well Known Member
#48
Here are some different wheel combos from over a few years.
View attachment 68012
Original P12 14x6 wheels with original tires. (wedding day, May 1964)

View attachment 68013
Keystone Classic 14x6 reversed on front, Sears Roadhandler tires. Olds 14x7 wheels on rear with M/T slicks. about 2005

View attachment 68014
About 2015, 14x6 chrome spoke front 215x14 Toyo tires. 14x7 rear and M/T slicks. I forgot the brand of wheel, I wouldn't recommend them, a little crooked, hard to balance, unilug.
Pic 3 look like Astro Supremes. I think U S Wheel still offers them.
 
#50
Its a shame you cant rechrome a wheel, or at least I havent found any shops that will. I have an original set of 14" reverse chrome wheels but the chrome is bad and the wheels have painted.
You can crome plate wheels or anything else, the process has been avaialble for more than 100 years. The reason you can't find many shops that will do chrome plating these days is because the process is highly toxic and "environmentally unfriendly". In many towns or cities, it has been made illegal to do it.

In the 1950's and '60's, I knew several shops in my neighborhood that did chrome plating. I knew the owners of those shops and many of the people that worked there. Every one of them died of cancer, at an unreasonbly early age.

The few shops that still do chrome plating have had to spend thousands of dollars investing in equipment, equipment that was never required "back in the day". From a health standpoint, "hexavalent chromium" is the most toxic form of chromium. In the U.S., the Environmental Protection Agency regulates it heavily. The EPA lists hexavalent chromium as a hazardous air pollutant because it is a human carcinogen, a "priority pollutant" under the Clean Water Act, and a "hazardous constituent" under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. Due to its low cathodic efficiency and high solution viscosity, a toxic mist of water and hexavalent chromium is released from the bath. Wet scrubbers are used to control these emissions. The discharge from the wet scrubbers is treated to remove (or try to remove) the chromium from the solution because it cannot remain in the waste water. In short, there is not enough money in doing chrome plating anymore, to make it worth the cost of meeting these stringent requirements or to even find employees willing to work in that kind of environment.
 

1964SuperStocker

Well Known Member
Supporting Member 2
#51
You can crome plate wheels or anything else, the process has been avaialble for more than 100 years. The reason you can't find many shops that will do chrome plating these days is because the process is highly toxic and "environmentally unfriendly". In many towns or cities, it has been made illegal to do it.

In the 1950's and '60's, I knew several shops in my neighborhood that did chrome plating. I knew the owners of those shops and many of the people that worked there. Every one of them died of cancer, at an unreasonbly early age.

The few shops that still do chrome plating have had to spend thousands of dollars investing in equipment, equipment that was never required "back in the day". From a health standpoint, "hexavalent chromium" is the most toxic form of chromium. In the U.S., the Environmental Protection Agency regulates it heavily. The EPA lists hexavalent chromium as a hazardous air pollutant because it is a human carcinogen, a "priority pollutant" under the Clean Water Act, and a "hazardous constituent" under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. Due to its low cathodic efficiency and high solution viscosity, a toxic mist of water and hexavalent chromium is released from the bath. Wet scrubbers are used to control these emissions. The discharge from the wet scrubbers is treated to remove (or try to remove) the chromium from the solution because it cannot remain in the waste water. In short, there is not enough money in doing chrome plating anymore, to make it worth the cost of meeting these stringent requirements or to even find employees willing to work in that kind of environment.
I have used the powder coat "chrome" a few times to get a part done that otherwise would cost a fortune to actually chrome. If you prep it well the parts come out amazing. Plus its tough as nails in the end. I was a powder coat tech for several years for a huge manufacture and would recommend it over actual chroming any day from a cost and durability point. Though we all know how we like our shinny things to be as shinny as possible and there just isn't an exact replacement for real chrome yet.
 

real61ss

Well Known Member
Supporting Member 8
#52
You can crome plate wheels or anything else, the process has been avaialble for more than 100 years. The reason you can't find many shops that will do chrome plating these days is because the process is highly toxic and "environmentally unfriendly". In many towns or cities, it has been made illegal to do it.

In the 1950's and '60's, I knew several shops in my neighborhood that did chrome plating. I knew the owners of those shops and many of the people that worked there. Every one of them died of cancer, at an unreasonbly early age.

The few shops that still do chrome plating have had to spend thousands of dollars investing in equipment, equipment that was never required "back in the day". From a health standpoint, "hexavalent chromium" is the most toxic form of chromium. In the U.S., the Environmental Protection Agency regulates it heavily. The EPA lists hexavalent chromium as a hazardous air pollutant because it is a human carcinogen, a "priority pollutant" under the Clean Water Act, and a "hazardous constituent" under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. Due to its low cathodic efficiency and high solution viscosity, a toxic mist of water and hexavalent chromium is released from the bath. Wet scrubbers are used to control these emissions. The discharge from the wet scrubbers is treated to remove (or try to remove) the chromium from the solution because it cannot remain in the waste water. In short, there is not enough money in doing chrome plating anymore, to make it worth the cost of meeting these stringent requirements or to even find employees willing to work in that kind of environment.
I think you misunderstood my post. Getting items chrome plated isn't a problem, there is a chrome plating shop 10 miles from my house, they do my bumpers and other small items but they won't plate my wheels. Something about about the shape of the wheel. The chrome reverse wheels that were so popular back in the sixties were plated then the center was welded in. That's what these are, they were originally bought and used on a 66 Chevelle when the car was new.
 
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