Anyone know a good engine guy for my 348, near Columbus, Ohio.

oldskydog

Well Known Member
Supporting Member 9
#44
Do those 555 heads have combustion chambers? I believe that head was only used in 61 before the 962 block and 333 heads were introduced for late 61-62. If it has combustion chambers then the block should only have one notch, if they are flat then it will likely have 2 notches.
 

scott hall

Well Known Member
Supporting Member 2
#46
I talked to Bruce today when picking up an engine. He said For you to call. They are pretty busy so if he doesn’t answer to leave a message and he’ll get back to you. Number is (937) 228-7278. Think the address is 714 Hall Ave Dayton Ohio. Just off 75. When your ready to take it down if that’s what you decide I’ll get the heads to him. Or can bring them to 42 if everything goes smooth down here. Or meet you somewhere when I can.
Scott
 
#47
So, I picked this motor up from Dave yesterday. From pulling one head and intake there's 4 bent pushrods and one bent valve. Motor is super clean inside and looks as though still has stock bore and stock pistons. Motor is double notch 011 348 with 555 heads as mentioned earlier in this post.

My question for you guys is what, if possible, do I need to do in order to get 300-325hp out of this motor? Would like to keep as many of the original parts as possible. Planning to dress it up and place into my 62 impala for driving and cruise-ins.

Thanks in advance!

MVIMG_20190914_193203.jpg
 

Don Jacks

Well Seasoned Member
Supporting Member 3
#48
Yes 320 is possible with the right parts,just not with those heads. You're biggest draw back with the double notcher is that you can't build much compression.A 10.5 piston will net you just under 9-1 as long as you don't enlarge or put back the counter bore after the block is bored.An 0950 cam,a 340 horse 409 intake,and a set of 817 heads will get you there.
 

Don Jacks

Well Seasoned Member
Supporting Member 3
#50
There are two distinct types of 348 truck/industrial/agricutual/marine engines out there.They could be considered as early and late prooduction.The first is the double notched blocks.They had very poor heads and intakes for any kind of performance use.The second type came out in late 61 for the 62 production.They had armisteel main caps,thicker webs,a far superior 333 heads and the same single notch set up that the car 348's did.These blocks had the 962 and 655 casting numbers .the intake,like the 250 horse car intake still sucked.
 

boxerdog

Well Known Member
Supporting Member 5
#54
I would have a hard time putting a lot of effort into a double-notch 348 when there are lots of 655s out there in great shape and usually reasonable prices, and a complete motor might well also host a set of 333 heads. Much better foundation for a stroker. Most of the ones I have seen are standard bore and show little wear.
 

1964SuperStocker

Well Known Member
Supporting Member 2
#55
I would have a hard time putting a lot of effort into a double-notch 348 when there are lots of 655s out there in great shape and usually reasonable prices, and a complete motor might well also host a set of 333 heads. Much better foundation for a stroker. Most of the ones I have seen are standard bore and show little wear.
What is "reasonable"? Is there any comparison to a cheap 348 block (car/truck)? The reason I have more 348 blocks than 409 blocks is because price. No one cares if I stroke a 348 over a 409 when I can light the tires up with either. The 4 inch stroked 348's can produce some serious power.
 

benchseat4speed

Well Known Member
Supporting Member 3
#56
What boxerdog said, #54:good

But if you must use that double notch, the more displacement, the easier it is to get a good compression ratio. Good being 10:1 plus. The more stroke you throw at it the higher the ratio. Sounds like you’ll need a 4” crank just overcome 10ci worth of notches at the top of the bore:brush:brush:brush

As long as you’re having pistons made, use as long a rod as possible. Keep that rod/stroke ratio as high as you can. And, break that ‘thumpr’ cam in about 5 pieces and mail it back to comp cams with a Christmas card.:gift
 

Don Jacks

Well Seasoned Member
Supporting Member 3
#57
Kevin there have been several 9.5-9.7-1 cr W engines,some recently.While not exactly what most people consider the 10 .5 range sweet spot,they can run really well with no worries about fuel.In his case I'd use the KB piston that's rated at about 10.8 would put him about 9.2- 9.3-1.With some careful thoughtful engine building,such as being sure to NOT put the counter bore back in the block after boring,one can gain at least .5 more compression.This thing can run damned good if the right combination of parts,machine work and assembly techniques are used.Sure a 9 62 or 655 would be a better base,but part of hot roding is making use of what you have.
 

boxerdog

Well Known Member
Supporting Member 5
#58
What is "reasonable"? Is there any comparison to a cheap 348 block (car/truck)? The reason I have more 348 blocks than 409 blocks is because price. No one cares if I stroke a 348 over a 409 when I can light the tires up with either. The 4 inch stroked 348's can produce some serious power.
I'm not sure I understand your response. I'm not picking on stroked 348s, in fact I currently own two, a 385 and a 414. And I wouldn't hesitate to build another. Reasonable? A 655 is a 348 truck block, and complete engines, when you find them, can be had for under $1000. I am in complete agreement with using 348 blocks when they are available. Many of the remaining 409s could be considered "used up" or have been damaged or poorly machined. All I was saying is that not all 348 blocks are created equal. While you might get the CR close to useful (in a double-notch block), I have to doubt that the resulting large combustion chamber is optimal in any way. Also, the later blocks have thicker main webs and Armasteel caps like the 409s and would probably be a better base for a stroker. But in the end, it's your money and you are the one that has to be happy with the end result.
 
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