Can I find spray paint for my fawn interior 63 dash

Junky

Well Known Member
#9
Im painting the large heater delete plate for the firewall black, but Im painting the heater delete panel for the dash the same color as the rest of the dash
I would say that you are hoping that it will be the same color as the rest of the dash, however, even when they get the paint color correct, it is difficult to duplicate the patina that the old paint has. I am going through this now with my dash in my '62. I'm installing a new padded dash covering, and once I had the dash out, I realized how crappy it looked, and am in the process of painting the instrument panel part of the dash. The biggest problem that I have experienced is that with all the different suppliers of parts that were painted at different times, there are a lot of shade differences. You don't notice this on the car when you are driving it, but once you put a refurbished part on, it quickly becomes apparent.
Look for a store that has the ability to color match if the scan doesn't capture the color well. This is what had to be done with my 1962, since the color formula was obsolete.
 

Tom Kochtanek

Well Known Member
Supporting Member 9
#11
I did a complete dash a few months back and took both the paint code and a sample (glove box). The first "mix" into a rattle can off the paint code was wayyyy too Orange (it was to be a Red dash for a 1962 Biscayne) and I had ordered three cans at $26 per can :(. The store mixed me three new cans of the correct color based on the glove box door at no cost (he felt bad). Worked out OK in the end. Anybody want a few cans or the wrong red?

i did put a clear over the top section, went with Satin to cut down on glare. Not a show car, just a nice driver, so I wasn't trying to be factory perfect.

Good luck!
TomK
 

Junky

Well Known Member
#13
You will not get a match by going off the paint code in the cowl tag. Ask me how I know.
At one time, the paint codes on the cowl tag actually did a good job of color matching, however, as paints have evolved, and tints have changed tones, it is next to impossible to get an accurate color match today without having an experienced paint mixer who knows how to adjust formulas to match the original. On my 1962 blue dash, the paint store started with the 1966 dash color, and adjusted it from there to get as close an exact match that is possible. They also did the same with the SEM vinyl dye and got an almost exact match to the original vinyl as seen in the underside of the vinyl dash.

I did a complete dash a few months back and took both the paint code and a sample (glove box). The first "mix" into a rattle can off the paint code was wayyyy too Orange (it was to be a Red dash for a 1962 Biscayne) and I had ordered three cans at $26 per can :(. The store mixed me three new cans of the correct color based on the glove box door at no cost (he felt bad). Worked out OK in the end. Anybody want a few cans or the wrong red?

Keep the cans that are off color for a base color when you need to do a buildup of color on primed metal. Then use the correct color as your top coat for an exact match.

i did put a clear over the top section, went with Satin to cut down on glare. Not a show car, just a nice driver, so I wasn't trying to be factory perfect.

Were you able to paint your dash top without removing the windshield first? I would really like to paint my dash, however, I don't believe that I can get a good finish without first removing the windshield first. My car is a 1962.

Good luck!
TomK
 

pvs409

Well Known Member
Supporting Member 7
#14
All the interior paint codes for dashes in 59 to 64 Chevy are “not the same” as the exterior colors.
I have all the old paint codes for those years published in a old issue of The Late Great Chevy magazine. The codes are
from 3 paint company’s from the 60’s for each different color.
Matching the existing color of dash parts is probably the better way to go than using these paint codes. I have looked up and listed the paint codes here and on other forums when requested by members.
Paul
 

1964SuperStocker

Well Known Member
Supporting Member 2
#16
Go to an automotive paint store and they can color match and make a spray can if you don't have the proper equipment
If you buy from an unknown source it will not match, period.
Best way to go! Just did it for my 64 belair wagon. I have 2 rattle cans of it now and will be using the same mix in a gallon soon to get some paint done on her. Top will be white first. Need to keep the car cool as possible with the boys inside.
 

Junky

Well Known Member
#18
I had paint mixed and put into rattle cans for my '62, and after spraying my dash, the paint dried way too fast, and it dried like sandpaper. I just called the shop that I use, and spoke to the painter. He told me that the thinner (acetone) in the spray can dries too fast, and that was the problem. I still have 8 ounces of paint, and hopefully that will be enough to cover the dash. Only other time that I had a problem was with this same rattle can paint on my steering wheel. When I clear coated it, it looked great, however, when the car sat in the sun for the first time, the clear coat got very tacky, and the finish was ruined. I don't think that I will be using rattle can paint ever again for anything that I care about. I will use my touch up gun for spraying small pieces where it is important to get a good finish on them.
 

1964SuperStocker

Well Known Member
Supporting Member 2
#19
Keep in mind its always about prep, content in the can and ability of you and the can to work together to create the desired result. If you don't like the content in the can then go with a different brand. I use the local O'reilly parts store. They mix our paint for my classic car dealership and their guy really knows his stuff. If he goes to another place to work, our business will follow him. I recently took them 3 samples of interior materials to match some paint to and that rattle can is a perfect match. Customer thought I had upholstered his armrest base but I just matched it to the cushion on top which created the desired effect.
 
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