Life expectancy of a shock absorber

Junky

Well Known Member
#1
Today, I removed the front left shock absorber to replace the lower control arm bushings, and to my surprise they are still the original spiral shocks. Needless to say, they are definitely worn out and leaking. Now, to find new shocks that will give a smooth ride, like the old ones. Any suggestions???






MVC-001L.JPG MVC-002L.JPG MVC-003L.JPG MVC-004L.JPG
 

Jim Sullivan

Well Known Member
Supporting Member 8
#2
From my past searching, I believe Monroe is the only one that has a front shock with the correct upper mount. Most others I have seen use the newer mounting with "loose" bushings that sandwich the mounting hole in the frame. And your supposed to drill out the hole for the bushings to fit correctly.
 

409newby

Well Known Member
Supporting Member 9
#3
I replaced mine on my 65 recently with KYB shocks just looked on internet the mounting looked the same as earlier models the ride is very good. :winner
 

Junky

Well Known Member
#5
If you want to keep your original dated shocks there are people who can rebuild them.
I looked into the cost, and it is $250 per shock, plus $25 return shipping, and I don't think that it is worth it for my car, since even though it is a matching numbers car, I doubt that investing $500 for matching number shocks will be worth while. The only time that I would consider it, would be if there wasn't a replacement available, and that was my only choice. In life, we all have to make choices, and at my age, I will let someone else worry about every last detail of originality. I will keep them with the rest of spare original parts, should the next caretaker want them.
Whenever possible, I use the correct part within cost reasonable price. If I were 30 years younger, I might even consider a frame off restoration, but not now. Besides, I prefer to drive my cars, rather than having a trailer queen, or a museum piece hidden away from the public viewing it.
 

63409

Well Known Member
#6
I looked into the cost, and it is $250 per shock, plus $25 return shipping, and I don't think that it is worth it for my car, since even though it is a matching numbers car, I doubt that investing $500 for matching number shocks will be worth while. The only time that I would consider it, would be if there wasn't a replacement available, and that was my only choice. In life, we all have to make choices, and at my age, I will let someone else worry about every last detail of originality. I will keep them with the rest of spare original parts, should the next caretaker want them.
Whenever possible, I use the correct part within cost reasonable price. If I were 30 years younger, I might even consider a frame off restoration, but not now. Besides, I prefer to drive my cars, rather than having a trailer queen, or a museum piece hidden away from the public viewing it.
My problem is I’m still trying to finish my frame off restoration/date coded and casting correct which has been taking forever, hopefully I can finish it before I die ,if I don’t make it all this effort will be wasted and somebody who sees all these parts laying around will think what’s all this junk. Little will they know how precious these cars and parts are to preserve so the next generation can see what the 60’s were all about. I’m just a caretaker and hopefully I can pass down history for future generations to learn and enjoy.
 

Junky

Well Known Member
#7
The best thing that you can do to preserve the history is to make notations on tags, and put those notations with the parts. The biggest problem that young people have, is that they have no references as to what parts go where. I belong to a club that is dedicated to the preservation of Professional Cars, and over the years, we have been able to keep many people from destroying original cars, once they learn about the history of the cars, and the significance of their manufacture and whom they served. To some, an ambulance, hearse, flower car, or limousine is just another car, until they learn that they all started as not much more than the front clip and the cowl, and that all the rest was manufactured by hand by craftsman, that learned the trade over decades learning from the people that came before them. Like the automobile companies at the turn of the century, numbered in the hundreds, and today, those hundreds in the US have dwindled down to only a hand full. It is up to us, the older generation to teach the younger generation the value of preservation as opposed to taking an original car and turning it into a modern car based on a 50 year old body. To me, it would be like a modern day sculpture artist adding new arms to the Venus de Milo statue.

Venus de Milo's arms.jpg
 

Junky

Well Known Member
#9
I agree 100%... If it is a car that was made by the tens of thousands, then a great number still exist, however, it is still a shame if the car is 100% original, complete, and a well preserved, it should be preserved, and not made into a rat rod.
If it were one of possibly 50 and only 10 are left, those should be preserved.
 

4onthefloor

Well Known Member
Supporting Member 1
#12
Yeah I will just keep them in the parts box for the next guy for that kind of coin. Im retired and I expect cat foot is going up in price this winter.
 
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