Shucking Corn The Easy Way

IMBVSUR?

Well Known Member
Supporting Member 2
#3
I have cleaned plenty of corn and it takes about 20 seconds and ear, no use of electricity from the microwave, no ovegloves for heat, no cutting on a cutting board. I am sure this works, however for me, this is unnecessary. I guess I am just too simplistic.
 

Junky

Well Known Member
#11
Don't shoot the messenger... :bow :juggle
Sorry, didn't mean it come across that way.
I know that you were joking, and so was I. Just enjoying the day poking fun at some posts on the forums. :cheers I am too old and grumpy to be serious any longer. :sos My get up and go got up and went, leaving me with nothing more than a keyboard and a warped sense of humor... :winner
 

Junky

Well Known Member
#12
I mentioned this to way of cooking corn to my wife that loves corn, and she said that pulling the hairs off the corn wasn't that much of a bother. I said ......... oh well, I better not go there...
Then I told her how we (me) would cook corn 70 years ago. Got the corn on Friday, and put it in a large pail filled with water. Placed a piece of plywood on top of the corn, and then placed a rock on top of the plywood to keep the corn submerged. On Saturday evening, or Sunday afternoon, would build a fire in the brick barbecue grill, and then roast the corn over the hot wooden coals, turning it every few minutes, until the husk was just starting to burn. Took the corn off, husked it, buttered it, and ate it. The water would steam the corn inside the husk, and it was very sweet and taste. If you didn't keep an eye on it, it would burn and that wasn't good. My job was also to turn it and not burn it. As a young kid, this was a lot of responsibility to have...
 

409newby

Well Known Member
Supporting Member 9
#13
I mentioned this to way of cooking corn to my wife that loves corn, and she said that pulling the hairs off the corn wasn't that much of a bother. I said ......... oh well, I better not go there...
Then I told her how we (me) would cook corn 70 years ago. Got the corn on Friday, and put it in a large pail filled with water. Placed a piece of plywood on top of the corn, and then placed a rock on top of the plywood to keep the corn submerged. On Saturday evening, or Sunday afternoon, would build a fire in the brick barbecue grill, and then roast the corn over the hot wooden coals, turning it every few minutes, until the husk was just starting to burn. Took the corn off, husked it, buttered it, and ate it. The water would steam the corn inside the husk, and it was very sweet and taste. If you didn't keep an eye on it, it would burn and that wasn't good. My job was also to turn it and not burn it. As a young kid, this was a lot of responsibility to have...
An old Indian buddy showed me this method, probably the best corn I've ever had then he said I'll show you how to butter it I replied I know how, he said no you dont!!! He buttered up a slice of bread cupped it laid the cob into it gave it a 1/4 turn pulled it out and Viola it was dripping with butter and he ate the slice of bread saying it tasted like BBQ corn!!! :bow:bow:bow
 

IMBVSUR?

Well Known Member
Supporting Member 2
#14
I know that you were joking, and so was I. Just enjoying the day poking fun at some posts on the forums. :cheers I am too old and grumpy to be serious any longer. :sos My get up and go got up and went, leaving me with nothing more than a keyboard and a warped sense of humor... :winner

I just have to be careful around here. One guy took things WAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAY off and wasn't happy. I guess I have to be careful with humor. Even so, sometimes things in print are not conveyed well as opposed to actually speaking with a person.
 

oleblu72

Well Known Member
Supporting Member 1
#16
Dad used to soak the corn and then bury the corn in the hot coals of the fire. I haven't had corn fixed this way in a coons age. Another thing I miss is when we used to make maple syrup . Dad would take potatoes and onions, carrots and throw in some bacon or kielbasa wrap it in foil and throw it in the hot coals then we would make coffee or tea out of the partially boiled sap.

Mark
 
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