The quest for more + caster

Jim Sullivan

Well Known Member
Supporting Member 7
#1
I had am idea the other day while trying to figure out how to get more caster on My 63. I am going to see how this works, so all comments/criticisms are welcome.

I turned down an upper control arm shaft in order to move the control arm more rearward. I took off about 3/8". Looks like there will be enough clearance on the frame. I am going to try and make a jig to check how this compares measurement wise to shimming the control arm. It may or may not provide enough of a change to make the effort worth while. We'll see. I'm not seeing where there would be a strength issue, but please let me know what I might be missing.
I will cut the machined piece down to original length and add spacers on the rear if the shaft. 20190105_113259.jpg 20190105_113251.jpg
 

Jim Sullivan

Well Known Member
Supporting Member 7
#3
I see that making a huge difference. I had thought of making offset bushings for the mounting holes to gain more caster. I like your idea better.
Since I was fiddling around with the lathe, I thought I'd see if I could machine the shaft as a test. As long as I used a live center to support the end and very low rpm, it spun pretty true. So, now to set up a jig to find out if it will add as much caster as a "several shim" change would. I think I can even use our engine run stand to set up the control arm. We'll see.
 

ragtp66

Well Known Member
#4
Jim,

I know someone else who was trying to get additional negative camber, after looking at what you are doing and thinking about it for a minute If you were to machine down the squarish blocks where the control arm mounts to the frame would it allow you to gain more camber even if its just a 1/16 or an 1/8th? My thinking is that effectively it would be the same as adding more shims pulling the top of the tire further inward, sometimes you run out of thread on the bolts with a fat shim pack or interference with headers etc. Not sure how much you could remove or if my thinking is off.

Chris
 

Jim Sullivan

Well Known Member
Supporting Member 7
#5
Chris, I'm thinking about the machining that you mentioned. I did just that on the control arm shafts that are on my four door now. I believe I machined the mounting area down almost 1/4" with no problems to date. Once I can mock up a control arm on a frame, I'm going to check clearances with the machining that I just did and see if I can machine the mounting area also. I hope all of this makes enough of a difference to make it worth while. It would be great to pick up a couple degrees positive caster.
 

heddrik

Well Known Member
#6
Very cool idea! If you could use a square plate with proper holes and a 4 jaw chuck ( if you have one) you could turn it faster on the lathe. Bolt shaft to plate and indicate it in, it wouldn't stick out very far either. good luck .
 

ragtp66

Well Known Member
#7
Jim if you decide to do it please let me know how it works out. I found out the HARD way that the cross shafts can go in BACKWARDS and you figure it out when the upper control arm hits the frame on the side closest to the firewall. Sucks having to knock it all back apart without scratching up the powdercoating. :doh

Thanks
Chris
 

Jim Sullivan

Well Known Member
Supporting Member 7
#8
The cross shafts are finished, except for some deburring. Now to blast the control arms and assemble. I ended up turning the front bushing mounting area back 1/2", added a 1/2" spacer collar on the rear(l will add a 1/2" spacer to the rear bushing mounting area) and I machined 1/4" from the front frame mounting pad area. I machined a little more that this from the upper control arm cross shafts that are currently on my four door, with only a slight improvement. I hope all of this makes enough of a difference to make it worth the effort. Hopefully I can try these out by early summer. 20190217_102101.jpg 20190217_102120.jpg 20190217_102128.jpg
 
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