Twisted Valve covers

1964SuperStocker

Well Known Member
Supporting Member 2
#2
I would personally not bother. Not sure you could grab it on both ends and twist it enough to get it back into shape without damage to something else.
 

El Rat

Well Known Member
#3
I’d put on an engine with screws and big “load” spreaders. Bring the motor up to temp you may have to put cardboard in front of the radiator and run it for awhile.
you could also bolt it down with “load spreaders” (the gold Moroso mouse motor VC had the spreaders) then stress relive with a soft hammer.
 

Tim

Well Known Member
Supporting Member 4
#4
I would personally not bother. Not sure you could grab it on both ends and twist it enough to get it back into shape without damage to something else.
Unfortunately I have to “bother” I waited over a month for these to come and I can’t go to the parts store and get a set. Engine is ready to go in. Just wondering if anybody ever had this. They are brand new steel.
 

1964SuperStocker

Well Known Member
Supporting Member 2
#5
Unfortunately I have to “bother” I waited over a month for these to come and I can’t go to the parts store and get a set. Engine is ready to go in. Just wondering if anybody ever had this. They are brand new steel.
In that case I would find whom ever you know around there that works with sheet metal. They can probably fix you up without to much trouble. I know a couple guys around here that do sheet metal fabrication and would have little trouble getting them laid back out smooth. A little heat in strategic places with some specific bending, twisting with a skilled hand goes a long ways. Ask Jim on those spiffy intakes he's putting together. He may have a tip for you too.
 

Jim Sullivan

Well Known Member
Supporting Member 9
#9
I would take a couple small pieces of wood, maybe a couple 12" 2x4s. Screw one cross ways on each end of the valve cover, clamp or screw one 2x4 down to a next with the other end overhanging off the edge. Gently apply twisting force, gradual increases if needed. Make sure to use washers or small strips of metal on the screw heads to spread the load on the valve cover flange. The short bends in the flange can be straightened with the flange on the edge of a block of wood with some gentle taps.
 

blkblk63ss

Well Known Member
Supporting Member 5
#11
If you have a junk head start bolting it down with bolt extenders and takimg a torch in the raised areas and heating and quenching with cold water tapping with a body hammer. Believe it or not i straighten a water pump pully that wobbled and took it of and tapped on mounting face with a ball peen hammer only no heat on a flat surface. It was amazing how if i tapped in wrong place it made it worse. Had to remount back on pump and tighten fan to it each time to see result. Finally figured out where to tap and then mark that spot with paint stick and after several attempts i got all wobble out. I had figured if nothing else i would try it,since it was on my 409 and not a common pully you dont find just anywhere.
 
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Tim

Well Known Member
Supporting Member 4
#14
I would take a couple small pieces of wood, maybe a couple 12" 2x4s. Screw one cross ways on each end of the valve cover, clamp or screw one 2x4 down to a next with the other end overhanging off the edge. Gently apply twisting force, gradual increases if needed. Make sure to use washers or small strips of metal on the screw heads to spread the load on the valve cover flange. The short bends in the flange can be straightened with the flange on the edge of a block of wood with some gentle taps.
Jim, ended up screwing the worst one to the bench so I could twist in increments. That worked good. Then took a rubber mallet at tweeked the flange straight.
 
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