"Venting" about a RockAuto part problem

rstreet

Well Known Member
Supporting Member 13
#21
Another update... I have received an email from RockAuto saying that the part number is correct for a rear right cylinder and that the original one had the wrong part in the box from manufacturing. So I guess I have to wait until tomorrow afternoon.
Don thanks for the suggestion of rebuilding my original with the parts from the incorrect left one. I had a great selection of hones back in the day but not sure where they ever went but as you say they aren't pricey.
I will wait until this one comes in but if it is wrong the pile of them is going out to Iowa to Dave Coots biggest Williams designed rock crusher at his quarries.
Robert
 

Carmine

Well Known Member
Supporting Member 7
#23
I've ordered a ton of parts from RockAuto. From what I recall, always a good experience. Lowest prices around for the same part. Shipping was a little different. Sometimes parts came from various locations. Might have added to the shipping cost, Carmine.
 

DonSSDD

Well Known Member
Supporting Member 2
#27
One thing rockauto is good for is their site has a good list of brands and part numbers and their site is easy to use. I use it to get part numbers and order locally plus it’s good for my daily driver parts. Their cross border shipping is the quickest and cheapest. The parts are the same quality as I get at local parts places and quite often has significantly lower cost and most times what I need is not on the shelf locally so needs to be shipped.
 

rstreet

Well Known Member
Supporting Member 13
#28
Maybe I'm the only one here that had bad luck honing and rebuilding slave cylinders, but new ones became the best fix that lasted.
Nope I had failures that I remember very well! A 65 big motor Corvette that I couldn’t get right so used stainless lined calipers. The Ford’s always worked well for me
Robert
 

Junky

Well Known Member
#29
Maybe I'm the only one here that had bad luck honing and rebuilding slave cylinders, but new ones became the best fix that lasted.
Please give a detailed explanation of how you honed and rebuilt the cylinders, and I'll bet that I can tell you why they failed. Me and my crystal ball are patiently awaiting your post... I am being honestly and truthful, when I say that there is a correct way, and an incorrect way, and most people don't know the difference.
 

Junky

Well Known Member
#31
Just a fine hone and some lubricant. 3 stones on it. Back in the 60's.
You were fine with what you had done, but you didn't complete the rest of your proceedure. I will assume for arguments sake, that you sprayed them down with brake cleaner and then wiped them down, as most everyone else does. Then you dipped the cups into brake fluid, and assembled the parts, installed on the car the rebuilt cylinder, and then bled the brakes. Am I correct in these assumptions?
 

Junky

Well Known Member
#36
OK.... now that we have all the facts, you did everything correctly, with the exception of how you cleaned the cylinder before rebuilding it. After you wash it down with brake cleaner, you should wash it with dish washing solution and hot water. Then blow dry or dry with a lint free towel. I use assembly fluid in place of brake fluid, but either is acceptable if you are going to be putting the cylinder back in service immediately. To prove the point about washing in hot water and dishwashing liquid, take an old cylinder, and hone it as you normally would, and then spray it with brake cleaner, and wipe dry. Then add a few drops oil into the cylinder, and then using a piece of tee shirt material on your finger, wipe the inside of the cylinder spreading the oil all around. When you remove your finger, look at the tee shirt material and you will see that it is grey with microscopically small particles of steel. These small particles of steel act like an abrasive on the rubber cups, and they will wear the cups, causing the cylinder to fail. The dishwashing liquid washes away these small particles, and you have a clean honed cylinder to use.
I learned this from a friend that rebuilds small engines. After he honed out a cylinder, I saw him washing it in the sink, and asked him why. He showed me exactly what I described above. He told me that the new rings would only last a fraction of the time that they were designed for, had he not removed this "abrasive".
 

Junky

Well Known Member
#37
Most that I have taken apart have pits to deep for a new cup to ever seal.
I have rebuilt many cylinders, when the cylinders were expensive, and the kits were cheap. I did find pits in some, but the pits were usually in the center, where the rubbers never came in contact with them. After honing, they were fine to use, and the pits didn't cause any problems. If the pits were in the area that the rubber cups traveled, then they were not reused. This was 60 years ago, when I pinched every penny I had to make it last longer. Today, I would rather rebuild an original cylinder or have it brass sleeved, then use a Chinese cylinder. About 15 years ago, I was doing the brakes on my 1963 Chrysler, and installed 4 new Chinese cylinders. I then bled the brakes with silicone fluid, and finished up for the night. The next morning, when I came down to the garage, I found that all 4 cylinders had leaked overnight, and I had a puddle under each wheel. That was the end for me with cheap wheel cylinders. I found 4 NOS cylinders, and took each of them apart, washed with brake cleaner, reassembled with fresh assembly fluid, and installed. The car is now in Texas, and the new owner has had no brake problems with the car, although the transmission will spill its oil on the floor, unless he starts it at least once a month.
 

La Hot Rods

Well Known Member
Supporting Member 1
#38
My experience the pitting is at the edge of the cu that has moved out for the wear on the shoes so when new shoes are installed the cup sets right it the pits.
 

Iowa 409 Guy

Well Known Member
Supporting Member 10
#39
That sounds familiar James. It's been a long time.

Heck Junky, I don't think brake kleen was even invented back then. All we ever washed parts in was gas. Sounds like a good tip using soap and water though.
 

rstreet

Well Known Member
Supporting Member 13
#40
Well..... just received the replacement brake cylinder from RockAuto and guess what? Yep is the same wrong part as previously. What the heck do they think the “L” means that is part of the stamping or casting number on the cylinder? Ok now what except use that service email every couple of hours
Robert
 
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