Nate's Aussie Belair Build

18htan

Well Known Member
Supporting Member 2
#61
Well went out with the boys for a few beers to get over my woes

Got home a just abit before 7am... I now have something else to trouble me, my sore head!
 

18htan

Well Known Member
Supporting Member 2
#63
Hey all... Its been a while since I have been on the forum and even longer since I have looked at the Belair.

I gave up and buggered off to Europe rather than spending the cash on the car. It basically came down to the fact that I simply cannot justify the money on 4 door Belair.

However, after a good mate gave me the keys to his Porsche 997 GT3, and winding it up to 322kmh (bees dick over 200mph) on the autobahn out of Frankfurt. I realized 3 things: 1. I want a Porsche 997 GT3 2. I will ever have one 3. I need a toy.

So this in a round about way brings me back to my bloody Belair. After re reading some of the posts from you guys, I am starting to entertain the idea of attempting the body work myself.

Keeping in mind that I may not be the most useful of blokes....

Can you guys suggest some resources to get me started? Websites, books, DVD's and any wise words?
 

LMBRJQ 60

Well Known Member
Supporting Member 4
#66
Hey all... Its been a while since I have been on the forum and even longer since I have looked at the Belair.

I gave up and buggered off to Europe rather than spending the cash on the car. It basically came down to the fact that I simply cannot justify the money on 4 door Belair.

However, after a good mate gave me the keys to his Porsche 997 GT3, and winding it up to 322kmh (bees dick over 200mph) on the autobahn out of Frankfurt. I realized 3 things: 1. I want a Porsche 997 GT3 2. I will ever have one 3. I need a toy.

So this in a round about way brings me back to my bloody Belair. After re reading some of the posts from you guys, I am starting to entertain the idea of attempting the body work myself.

Keeping in mind that I may not be the most useful of blokes....

Can you guys suggest some resources to get me started? Websites, books, DVD's and any wise words?
Hi Nate,
Good to see you back on here again. been a while.
Over here the local polytech (Tafe in melb) runs a basic metal working course for sheet metal with a body repair focus.
runs saturday morning for 4 hours 26 weeks. teaches the following in basic form;
accuracy in folding, welding with gas, tig, mig, shrinking and stretching, corrosion protection after welding, teaches how to form a dome in a flat piece of metal with a hammer then cut the centre out of the dome and make a new centre for it and weld it back in place and hammer it up.
Really good course, $550.00 for the 26 weeks and you get to bring in stuff that you are working on at home and get a hand with it from the tutor.
The tutors are usually old school coach builders or panel beaters that know their stuff.
Ron Covell has some good books and videos on basic metal shaping etc, give a list of basic tools etc
Im an electrician and i am now not afraid to tackle pretty much anything on a car body (maybe with the exception of a roof skin repair in the centre??)
All i can say is get some of the basic tools and have a play, tin snips left and right hand, hammer and a dolly and see what you can shape.
good luck

Steve
 

Dick MacKenzie

Well Known Member
Supporting Member 9
#67
Hi Nate,

In addition to Steve's suggestions for Ron Covell's info, you can also get some metal working and paint info from Grafitti at: http://www.graffitipub.com.au/techn...s-auto-resto-guide-to-metal-repair-color.html

Popular Hot Rodding did a couple Youtube videos on how to fix rust on your car or truck. They come with ads but the ads only last about 30 seconds.
Part 1: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ifJ_cxhJTGA&feature=related
Part 2: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oyPsis_-fa4&feature=relmfu

Eastwood has the tools you'll need. I have three suggestions
1. don't be in a hurry.
2. don't expect your work to be perfect the first time.
3. find an experienced friend who is willing to help/advise along the way

Good luck & keep us informed!
 

61BUBBLE348

Well Known Member
Supporting Member 9
#68
Hey Nate, you know those Porsche's are only pregnant pasties that have rolled a couple of times.

If you have the money to get a GT3, why not buy a nice 2 door 63 from the US and convert it using all your RHD stuff, maybe even leave it left hook.

just a suggestion.

cheers
 

18htan

Well Known Member
Supporting Member 2
#69
Haha Grub...

Mate if I could afford a Porsche I wouldn't be asking questions.

I like the idea of the tafe course, but am more inclined to do 26 weeks of trial and error. My brother has a Mig I can have, however the handle/trigger is stuffed. Not cheap to replace. Not sure where to source a replacement.

Think I will get myself semi setup and grab some old panels and have a play. Only problem, I live in the inner city and space is a premium.

I was just having a beer with my brother and he was laughing at how many times I have been let down by people in the trade, and how many years I have waited. So stuff it, what's a few more years in the big picture. Time to get myself setup, teach myself how to weld and get creative.

Now my thread can be filled with me bitching about my stuff ups, and not the constant updates of getting stuffed over.

Keep the input coming guys. Some of you that know me... Know I will need all the bloody help I can get. Right Don?
 

Rickys61

Well Known Member
Supporting Member 3
#70
Just keep your spirits up by working on smaller patches and areas that are going to be hidden to build up your confidence.. I too understand setbacks, my 61 in my avatar has looked like that since I got it in 1995
 

61BUBBLE348

Well Known Member
Supporting Member 9
#71
Hi Nate, if you have done little or no welding before, I highly recommend a small vocational course, if this is out of the question the Covell info is very good.

re MIG parts, most specialised tool joints sell parts, BOC, Future Tools/Twin Tools etc etc etc.

Of the work that I have seen you need to do, use cold rolled 1.00 or 1.2 mm sheet, use the MIG to tack only and fusion or TIG weld the panels in, remembering that most of your work will mainly be small patches, practice on some scrap. Mike Dascolli did some programmes on patch panels on Rodders Life a while ago which is also helpful. Re your space issue, I have seen guys do full builds with little space before, me being one, you just have to start and finish.

Good luck, and good to see you back.

cheers
 

LMBRJQ 60

Well Known Member
Supporting Member 4
#73

Ishiftem

Well Known Member
Supporting Member 2
#74
That sounds perfect. Also, the best advice I ever got was to fix absolutely every flaw not matter how small even if it is the size of a pin head. On your first job you will be sure to miss a few things. By fixing every small thing, you will minimize the things missed. Also remember what is underneath is more important than what is on top.
 

LMBRJQ 60

Well Known Member
Supporting Member 4
#78
:doh if it was me i would make a scale 409 and fit it in there east-west and have the pedal crank at the crankshaft

Steve
 

Phil Reed

Well Seasoned Member
Supporting Member 10
#79
By fixing every small thing, you will minimize the things missed. Also remember what is underneath is more important than what is on top.
ABSOLUTELY TRUE!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! The last car we did here...I was more proud of under the dash and the parts behind the door panels!!! I never wanted a customer to look anywhere, even behind door panels, and being upset with the quality of the restoration.
 
Top