Shop lift opinions needed

64ss409

Well Known Member
Supporting Member 9
#22
The local shop anchored their 2 post to the 6 in concrete floor, then made brackets on top and anchored to the ceiling. Been working since 1978.
 

rstreet

Well Known Member
Supporting Member 14
#23
Robert, just call the water dept. put some blue paint on the floor and tell them, the leak is here.
Ray remember I resemble that remark! My old repair/install crews would just pull up the whole floor and probably go with 8 inches of 4,000 mix with fibre and 5/8 rebar! But I must admit they never went behind themselves as I recall.
Robert
 

Don 409

Well Known Member
#24
I put in a Ben Pak XPR-10 10,000 symmetrical 2-post lift about 2 years ago. I have been pleased with it so far. My ceiling height is exactly 144 inches in the shop behind my house and Ben Pak told me the lift was 144 inches tall, well not exactly as I had to cut out the ceiling for clearance. They now advertise it as being 145 inches tall. They also told me that 4 inches of reinforced concrete was ok. I just called them after reading this post and now they say 4-1/2" concrete is minimum. I guess they was just trying to sell me a lift. I bought it to restore a Corvette but I also use it for maintenance for my 2003 F-250 Super Duty. I can get in and out of the F-250 without any problems. I haven't lifted the 64 SS yet and I would like also like to know where the lifting points are. The guy next door poured my concrete (he does this for a living) when I built my shop. I remember him saying at the time he was going to put in a high grade of concrete. I haven't had any problems like cracking concrete so I guess I'm just lucky. I also use the tall jack stands for stability because you can rock the car while it is on the lift. If you are pulling or pushing on car parts and the car is rocking it is a little unnerving. Safety first.
Don
 

Carmine

Well Known Member
Supporting Member 8
#25
Every vendor that I contacted stated that 6" of 3000 psi reinforced concrete was necessary on preferably undisturbed soil, for the 2 post lift. I too am cautious to an extent. I don't trust lifts, as is, 100% including my own. That's why I bought and use tall jack stands. One under the rear, the other under the a-frame. Each capable of holding 2000 lbs. Gives me peace of mind. I wouldn't work underneath the car without them. To me, having a lift is a luxury. It makes so many jobs so much easier. Wouldn't want to be without it, but that's not to say its time to get careless either. I assembled it according to specs and it gets used as suggested by the manufacturer. Thus far, never have had a problem, Carmine.
 

Jeff Olson

Well Known Member
Supporting Member 2
#26
I guess I'm overly cautious but there's no way I would walk under a two post lift bolted to 6 inches of concrete.
If I was going to install a two post lift in an existing building with a 4 inch concrete floor. I would rent a concrete saw, cut a 3' x 3' hole in the concrete under each post, dig a hole at least 24" deep then come back with 4000 psi concrete with four 18" long ankor bolts. Then I'd wait at least 3 or 4 days curing time before bolting the lift in place. Might be overkill but that's better than being killed
I agree, when we installed my son in law's two post lift we basically did the same thing other than we cut out 2' square and dug down 2' and poured 4000 lb. concrete with fiber for the posts. He has had everything from our 67 Impala to one ton pickups on it and no issues at all.
 

1961BelAir427

Well Known Member
Supporting Member 3
#27
I talked to both the guys who sold/installed the lifts at our dealership and to the concrete guys that I'd use to do my slab. Both said that 4" slab of 4000 lb. concrete reinforced with fiber would be the minimum for a lift and would be safe. Even still, I plan on digging down and making that section much thicker. At least 12".....maybe as much as 2' BELOW the rest of the slab which I guess I'll just do the 4". Was thinking about maybe putting a foot of gravel and then a foot of concrete under where the posts will sit. Both spots 3'x3' like Tommy said. If I'm doing the digging and framing it won't cost much more and I sure will feel safer.
 

Carmine

Well Known Member
Supporting Member 8
#28
In addition to wanting the 6" thick 3000 psi concrete for strength, the anchor bolts are also quite long. From what I recall, I know they are 3/4" diameter and at least 4-5" long. This is after going through the base plate of the tower which by itself is 1/2" thick; maybe even 5/8". I think they are looking for deep penetration in the concrete.
 
#29
When I ordered my 10,000 lb bend pac 2 post I was told 4" of concrete was required. I have 6" and am not at all concerned. I routinely lift the front of a Peterbilt with a bottle jack and that is as heavy as the total lift capacity on ONE footprint that is much smaller than those on the lift. That's about double the lift capacity on half the footprint and I doubt that I will EVER get close to a 10,000 lb load on the lift. Even my dually diesel, crewcab 4X4 doesn't weigh 10,000 lbs. I know of others that put the same lift on 4" concrete and they put a 3ft X 3ft 1/2" plate under each post to spread the weight and have used them for years with no issues
 

Jeff Olson

Well Known Member
Supporting Member 2
#30
When I ordered my 10,000 lb bend pac 2 post I was told 4" of concrete was required. I have 6" and am not at all concerned. I routinely lift the front of a Peterbilt with a bottle jack and that is as heavy as the total lift capacity on ONE footprint that is much smaller than those on the lift. That's about double the lift capacity on half the footprint and I doubt that I will EVER get close to a 10,000 lb load on the lift. Even my dually diesel, crewcab 4X4 doesn't weigh 10,000 lbs. I know of others that put the same lift on 4" concrete and they put a 3ft X 3ft 1/2" plate under each post to spread the weight and have used them for years with no issues
True, but you have to take into consideration the balance of the weight. Spreading the weight across the area definitely helps but if you take the head from a motor and hold it up by your chest will it exert the same pressure as if you try to hold it at arms length? The issue in my opinion is more the front to back stress on the concrete than the up and down pressure.
 

Carmine

Well Known Member
Supporting Member 8
#31
True, but you have to take into consideration the balance of the weight. Spreading the weight across the area definitely helps but if you take the head from a motor and hold it up by your chest will it exert the same pressure as if you try to hold it at arms length? The issue in my opinion is more the front to back stress on the concrete than the up and down pressure.
A very valid point.
 
#34
True, but you have to take into consideration the balance of the weight. Spreading the weight across the area definitely helps but if you take the head from a motor and hold it up by your chest will it exert the same pressure as if you try to hold it at arms length? The issue in my opinion is more the front to back stress on the concrete than the up and down pressure.
That was a concern for me as well. However, the lift comes with the anchors and they are only long enough to go in the concrete 4". I could be missing something here but it seems to me that if the anchors are in the concrete 4", whether the concrete is 4" or 30" thick, the holding strength of the anchors would be the same.
 

Fathead Racing

Well Known Member
Supporting Member 7
#35
If you can get a lift you can cut out the concrete and make it right. Grade 5 all thread poured in the footer that you have excavated will be more than enough to handle what you intend to do. You guys are smart enough to build 12.00 second 4000 lb. cars and I know you know how to anchor a two post lift to the floor. I'll show you how to do it and I just claimed down from the trees!
 

awsumcars

Well Known Member
Supporting Member 4
#36
Lots of great info here. I have been in the market for a 4-post (have a 2 post A-symmetrical) and I fought with the "China Syndrome". Worth Lifts out of Texas builds em' in the good ol USA. A little more buckeroos, but I'll get lasting pleasure and piece of mind with "Build in the USA. Great family biz to work with as well.
 

Mearl

Well Known Member
Supporting Member 6
#37
When I built my garage with a lift in mind, I had the floor poured 5" w
and Darrin put extra rebar in it. It's been seven years and I use it almost every weekend; no problems.
Now I'm looking to get a 4 post with casters so I can roll it outside and blast the bottom of cars with my dustless blaster.
 

Carmine

Well Known Member
Supporting Member 8
#38
Lots of great info here. I have been in the market for a 4-post (have a 2 post A-symmetrical) and I fought with the "China Syndrome". Worth Lifts out of Texas builds em' in the good ol USA. A little more buckeroos, but I'll get lasting pleasure and piece of mind with "Build in the USA. Great family biz to work with as well.
When I was looking at lifts, the only USA made one that I could find, was a Mohawk brand, which was expensive. I'm glad you found one for yourself, Carmine.
 

Jeff Olson

Well Known Member
Supporting Member 2
#39
When I built my garage with a lift in mind, I had the floor poured 5" w
and Darrin put extra rebar in it. It's been seven years and I use it almost every weekend; no problems.
Now I'm looking to get a 4 post with casters so I can roll it outside and blast the bottom of cars with my dustless blaster.
Have you picked out a 4 post yet? Manufacturer?
 
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